PAUL AINSWORTH'S SMOKED UGBROOKE TROUT PATE WITH GRILLED ROSEMARY SOURDOUGH

Serves 4

Trout

  • 6 fillets of smoked trout – we like Severn and Wye Smokery

  • 20g baby capers

  • 2 baby cucumber sized pickled gherkins (finely diced)

  • 150g Jersey royals or a lovely new potato (diced)

  • 30g freshly chopped chives

  • 30g freshly chopped flat leaf parsley

  • 2 small banana shallots (finely diced)

  • Rock salt and pepper

  • Juice of 1 lemon and zest

Rapeseed mayonnaise

  • 2 egg yolks

  • 10g water

  • 5g Dijon mustard

  • Fresh lemon juice to taste

  • 8g white wine vinegar

  • Salt and pepper to taste

  • 150g vegetable oil

  • 100g Mrs Middleton’s rapeseed oil

Grilled Sourdough

  • 1 loaf of fantastic quality rye sourdough 

  • 3 sprigs rosemary

  • Extra virgin olive oil to drizzle

  • Rock salt and pepper

Method

Start off by making the rapeseed mayonnaise. Place all the ingredients apart from the oils in a small food processor and blend. Gradually whizz in the oils until the texture is thick and creamy. Taste to check the seasoning and acidity and leave to chill. 

In the meantime you can prepare the fish. Gently break the trout into large soft flakes into a bowl, removing any bones as you go along. Then add the baby capers, chives, parsley and diced new potatoes. Now add the finely diced shallots and gherkins and very gently add a bit of the mayonnaise. Be careful not to add too much mayonnaise else you will overpower the trout and make it too creamy. Season the mix with salt, pepper, fresh lemon juice and zest and give it a taste. Combine this mixture as gently as possible, taking care to not break up the lovely flakes of trout. Leave in a bowl covered and serve at room temperature.

Lastly, slice the loaf into 1cm slices. Season one side with rock salt, pepper and drizzle with olive oil. Pull the sprigs off the rosemary and chop them very finely. Then sprinkle this rosemary liberally over. Toast the bread on a very hot chargrill pan on both sides for that authentic barbecue taste.